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  • 161 5 8 hours ago
  • 7 years and a few hours ago 
#colorized
  • 7 years and a few hours ago
    #colorized
  • 196 7 8 hours ago
  • Third Army Louisiana Maneuvers, Camp Polk, La., Pvt Clarence Jones, North Birmingham, Alabama, in slit trench, outfitted with the modern M-1 helmet and an M-1 carbine with carbine, ‘On the Alert’. 4/17/43. 594th Field Artillery Battalion A (NARA-EUCMH)

The 93rd Infantry Division got its start as an all-black outfit during World War I and proved its mettle in ferocious battles in France.

During World War II, the U.S. Army fielded 68 infantry divisions; the normal number of soldiers hovered between 14,000 and 18,000 per division. By early December 1941, the African American press, along with some of their white counterparts, was campaigning to expand the participation of blacks in the war expected to come.
In turn, the U.S. Army clearly stated its position on racial integration. Social integration was a civilian-sociological activity to figure out. It was never meant to be a military issue. In regard to the anticipated war, the Army first envisioned four all-black divisions, but in the end only half came to be. One division—the 92nd—wound up in Italy, while the other—the 93rd—served in the Pacific Theater.
Another division, which would have been designated the 2nd Cavalry Division, got as far as Oran, Algeria, on March 9, 1944. Once there, it was broken up and divvied out in parcels as support units to larger operations and mostly in noncombat roles. It would be up to the 92nd and 93rd to show what the African American infantry soldier was capable of doing.

By war’s end the 93rd would get as far as Mindanao and Leyte in the Philippines while under the command of Brig. Gen. Leonard R. Boyd. When official word of Japan’s surrender came, since there was a shortage of fireworks, the rifles blazed away in celebration. Sergeant James Yancy, 369th Infantry Regiment, said the 93rd joined in the celebration. Then a white officer came over to Yancy’s elated group and ordered them to cease firing; all of their weapons were confiscated. The white troops kept firing away with their celebrations.

During their two years in the Southwest Pacific, the men of the 93rd accumulated 825 military awards for valor and meritorious service: one Distinguished Service Cross,
  • Third Army Louisiana Maneuvers, Camp Polk, La., Pvt Clarence Jones, North Birmingham, Alabama, in slit trench, outfitted with the modern M-1 helmet and an M-1 carbine with carbine, ‘On the Alert’. 4/17/43. 594th Field Artillery Battalion A (NARA-EUCMH)

    The 93rd Infantry Division got its start as an all-black outfit during World War I and proved its mettle in ferocious battles in France.

    During World War II, the U.S. Army fielded 68 infantry divisions; the normal number of soldiers hovered between 14,000 and 18,000 per division. By early December 1941, the African American press, along with some of their white counterparts, was campaigning to expand the participation of blacks in the war expected to come.
    In turn, the U.S. Army clearly stated its position on racial integration. Social integration was a civilian-sociological activity to figure out. It was never meant to be a military issue. In regard to the anticipated war, the Army first envisioned four all-black divisions, but in the end only half came to be. One division—the 92nd—wound up in Italy, while the other—the 93rd—served in the Pacific Theater.
    Another division, which would have been designated the 2nd Cavalry Division, got as far as Oran, Algeria, on March 9, 1944. Once there, it was broken up and divvied out in parcels as support units to larger operations and mostly in noncombat roles. It would be up to the 92nd and 93rd to show what the African American infantry soldier was capable of doing.

    By war’s end the 93rd would get as far as Mindanao and Leyte in the Philippines while under the command of Brig. Gen. Leonard R. Boyd. When official word of Japan’s surrender came, since there was a shortage of fireworks, the rifles blazed away in celebration. Sergeant James Yancy, 369th Infantry Regiment, said the 93rd joined in the celebration. Then a white officer came over to Yancy’s elated group and ordered them to cease firing; all of their weapons were confiscated. The white troops kept firing away with their celebrations.

    During their two years in the Southwest Pacific, the men of the 93rd accumulated 825 military awards for valor and meritorious service: one Distinguished Service Cross,
  • 1,167 7 9 hours ago
  • "Le portrait de  RICHARD GIGNOUD" by #vincentmallea for PROFILE SPLENDA, 2011 
PROFILE SPLENDA is a label of "#photoart and #folkart #portrait" launched in 2010 by #vincentmallea, inspired by both the #glamourpictures of #actors from the #golden age of #Hollywood and systematization of #colorful #popart.
A PROFILE SPLENDA portrait is a #colorized picture, made with #color palette, mounted in several layers of #collage on a 65x65cm board, completed in #pencil and #markerpaint and #varnish. Each portrait is a unique, original, signed, dated on the edge, and numbered. Each portrait is prepared and carried out with the help of its sponsor : it is the product of the direct relationship of the sponsor to the #frenchartist, and because it escapes any intermediary, it is a #workofart both inexpensive and affordable. ☆ Tumblr @ http://profilesplenda.tumblr.com/
☆ Videodoc @ http://vimeo.com/87812709
☆ Catalogue (Ed. Février 14) @ http://www.blurb.fr/bookstore/invited/4315705/0bb237d57073886f5a4568b396cfd723fbf91125

#studio #colorfull #style #frenchartist #photoart
  • "Le portrait de  RICHARD GIGNOUD" by  #vincentmallea  for PROFILE SPLENDA, 2011 
    PROFILE SPLENDA is a label of " #photoart  and  #folkart   #portrait " launched in 2010 by  #vincentmallea , inspired by both the  #glamourpictures  of  #actors  from the  #golden  age of  #Hollywood  and systematization of  #colorful   #popart .
    A PROFILE SPLENDA portrait is a  #colorized  picture, made with  #color  palette, mounted in several layers of  #collage  on a 65x65cm board, completed in  #pencil  and  #markerpaint  and  #varnish . Each portrait is a unique, original, signed, dated on the edge, and numbered. Each portrait is prepared and carried out with the help of its sponsor : it is the product of the direct relationship of the sponsor to the  #frenchartist , and because it escapes any intermediary, it is a  #workofart  both inexpensive and affordable. ☆ Tumblr @ http://profilesplenda.tumblr.com/
    ☆ Videodoc @ http://vimeo.com/87812709
    ☆ Catalogue (Ed. Février 14) @ http://www.blurb.fr/bookstore/invited/4315705/0bb237d57073886f5a4568b396cfd723fbf91125

    #studio   #colorfull #style #frenchartist   #photoart
  • 22 0 10 hours ago
  • Star birthday, Ann Sheridan. Born February 21, 1915.  In March of 1939 Warners announced Sheridan had been voted by a committee of 25 men as the actress with the most "oomph" in America.

She received as many as 250 marriage proposals from fans in a single week. Tagged "The Oomph Girl"—a sobriquet which she reportedly loathed—Sheridan was a popular pin-up girl in the early 1940s. (On the other hand, a February 25, 1940, news story distributed by the Associated Press reported that Sheridan no longer "bemoaned the 'oomph' tag." She continued, "But I'm sorry now. I know if it hadn't been for 'oomph' I'd probably still be in the chorus.") Clara Lou Sheridan (February 21, 1915 – January 21, 1967), known professionally as Ann Sheridan, was an American actress and singer. She worked regularly from 1934 to her death in 1967, first in film and later in television. Notable roles include San Quentin (1937) with Pat O'Brien and Humphrey Bogart, Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) with James Cagney and Bogart, They Drive by Night (1940) with George Raft and Bogart, The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942), Kings Row (1942) with Ronald Reagan, Nora Prentiss (1947) and I Was a Male War Bride (1949) with Cary Grant. 
Color by Victor Mascaro #AnnSheridan #Colorized #Technicolor #oomph #oomphgirl
  • Star birthday, Ann Sheridan. Born February 21, 1915. In March of 1939 Warners announced Sheridan had been voted by a committee of 25 men as the actress with the most "oomph" in America.

    She received as many as 250 marriage proposals from fans in a single week. Tagged "The Oomph Girl"—a sobriquet which she reportedly loathed—Sheridan was a popular pin-up girl in the early 1940s. (On the other hand, a February 25, 1940, news story distributed by the Associated Press reported that Sheridan no longer "bemoaned the 'oomph' tag." She continued, "But I'm sorry now. I know if it hadn't been for 'oomph' I'd probably still be in the chorus.") Clara Lou Sheridan (February 21, 1915 – January 21, 1967), known professionally as Ann Sheridan, was an American actress and singer. She worked regularly from 1934 to her death in 1967, first in film and later in television. Notable roles include San Quentin (1937) with Pat O'Brien and Humphrey Bogart, Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) with James Cagney and Bogart, They Drive by Night (1940) with George Raft and Bogart, The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942), Kings Row (1942) with Ronald Reagan, Nora Prentiss (1947) and I Was a Male War Bride (1949) with Cary Grant.
    Color by Victor Mascaro #AnnSheridan #Colorized #Technicolor #oomph #oomphgirl
  • 167 13 12 hours ago